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Inheritance
Elf
rix_scaedu
I wrote this to lilfluff's fifth prompt.  It is followed by Inheritance 2.

“Hang on,” Henry just wanted to be clear, “I get a thirtieth of Great-Great-Uncle William’s estate?”

“Yes,”  the elderly solicitor looked at him benevolently.  “In Mr Hordren’s words ‘because of his common politeness and his frank self-assessment that he would be getting nothing in my will.’  Mr Hordren did not care for assumptions about the dispersal of his estate.”

Henry thought for a moment about his late relative’s house and its contents.  After visits to William’s his mother and other female relatives had talked about ‘hoarder’ and ‘clean-up’.  “This thirtieth share,” he asked cautiously, “is it by volume, weight or value?”

“Aptitude test,” was the reply.  “Certain of your relatives who assumed themselves to be Mr Hordren’s main heirs based on primogeniture are receiving nothing.  The existence of his children from several liaisons has come as a nasty shock to them.”

“I can imagine.”  That branch of the family, and the gulf of generations between them, was why Henry had had no expectations on William’s death.

“The aptitude testing will take place at Mr Hordren’s house at 9:00am on the eighteenth.”  Looking at Henry’s face the solicitor added, “He has made provision for the estate to pay your salary for the day if you need to take leave without pay to be there.”

Not wanting to be late, Henry arrived at fifteen minutes to nine and was admitted to one of the front rooms by the formidable housekeeper who’d kept family unclutterers at bay for years.  By nine on the clock, there were seven of them in the room: himself; his first cousin Annabelle; two more distant cousins descended from William’s youngest brother; two of William’s own hitherto unknown descendents; and a completely unrelated blond boy of an age with the rest of them.

At one past the hour the solicitor entered the room with two costumed figures.  The seven young people fell silent, feeling far too close to an impending clash between the Green Seer and the Fallen Mystic.

“The late Mr Hordren was,” the solicitor said drily to the room at large, “a trophy collector during the period when he operated as the Masked Shadow.  Consequently, he had a number of items that he felt should only go to suitable recipients.  Before his death he arranged for the two most powerful and ethical sensitives currently working to assess each of you.  Based on their findings you might receive your thirtieth share in cash or you might receive a combination of articles.”

Henry, for one, was flabbergasted.  Nice, old, slightly strange Great-Great-Uncle William was one of the most notorious super villains of the first half of the previous century.  It seemed impossible.  He and Annabelle exchanged looks, the rest of the family was never going to believe it.  And yet…



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Moar?

(Seven people each due a 30th of a share? What happens to the other 23/30ths? And who's the mysterious blond?)

Good questions. I was about to say maybe the others are getting more, but the solicitor did appear to be speaking to all of them.

Various theories on who the unrelated blond might be, but without anything to go on they're pretty much pure guesses.

Oh, and moar please. :)

Hmm. Well, it says "two of William’s own hitherto unknown descendents", so perhaps he had more children who might get something, but not any of the trophies? And quite possibly a good chunk will go to a cause he found to be of interest? Endowing a supervillain museum? Had he reformed, or just retired?

<bounce!>

I started doing a family tree for this so be very afraid. William was born in 1905 so there's plenty of time for his children to have children of their own...

I was thinking a tenth share for each of his four children, or their descendents. Another 30% on various specific bequests, e.g. to the housekeeper.

If my maths is right, that leaves 9/30 of the estate. 7/30 are accounted for in this story which still leaves me 2/30 to go "Surprise!" with later if I need to.

I started doing a family tree for this so be very afraid. William was born in 1905 so there's plenty of time for his children to have children of their own...

I was thinking a tenth share for each of his four children, or their descendents. Another 30% on various specific bequests, e.g. to the housekeeper.

If my maths is right, that leaves 9/30 of the estate. 7/30 are accounted for in this story which still leaves me 2/30 to go "Surprise!" with later if I need to.

Two of William's descendants -- who are not necessarily his children -- are in the group in the story who get 1/30th each. But they might be (great-...-)grandchildren up for bonus shares of their own, and so not overlap with the 40% for children.

I started doing a family tree for this so be very afraid.

Can I go for "delighted" instead? :)

This is nifteh! ^_^ I have been browsing through your various entries, you don't happen to have published (self or not) work up somewhere?

Thank you for the kind words, but no I don't have anything published.

Darn, I was hoping to see some full-fledged stories. Well, there's always the future! Quick, Sherman, to the Way Forward Machine!

There's something close to a full story put up in parts under the tag "chambourian verses". The tag "seer" might be more useful to find the first one.

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